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20131205
20131205
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it
at the national security agency are not just intercepting calls but also tracking the movements of phones around the world. the paper cites documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. it says agents collect 5 billion records every day on cell phones across the planet. the report says agents use that information to track people of interest and identify their associates. u.s. government officials say nsa personnel are trying to prevent terrorism and only monitoring non-americans. >>> the pris tij ous hotel in prag has turned a secret cold war underground bunker into a tourist destination. the aim is to show visitors how it was once used as a center for spy operations. the alta hotel recently opened the bunker to mark its 55th anniversary. during the cold war the luxury hotel was a popular destination for both western tourists and journalists. hidden 20 meters under ground it can only be reached by ladder. a hotel official says only a few knew it ever existed. on display is some original spy equipment such as a tape recorder for listening on each of the hotel's 94 rooms, also a floor
security agency tracking cell phone locations gathering 5 billion records a day. evidently americans' cell phones overseas aren't being repd. more from edward snowden. joining me justice correspondent pete williams. pete, this is collecting data. then if they want to they can do back and see where your cell phone was used. is that basically -- they are not tracking us overseas in realtime when we use our cell phones? >> the term "tracking" used to describe is something of a misnomer, it's not realtime. it's storing the record of where the cell phone was when the call was made. as you say, this was outside united states. the nsa does this the capability to gather data inside but it has not, chosen not to do it but it does track it outside the u.s. it's part of what is in the database of phone calls. go back and try to reconstruct where someone was or try to develop relationships, see who was in a certain place where maybe something bad happened, who was around a person the time the call was made, that data. they say it's valuable to gather information on suspected terror cells overseas. as
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
.s. national security agencies is gathering billions of records from mobile phones around the world. that's according to leaked top secret documents given to the washington post by whistleblower edward snowden. it is said to track the movement of people in ways previously unimaginable. they use code traveller to map relationships and movements. american oticials say what they said was legal and reports were used on what they call foreign targets. civil rights campaigner say it's a breach of privacy. >> you are walking along minding your business thinking you'd never be of interest. if you have one of these there's every possibility that they are tracking where you've been and who you were speaking to. according to new documents, it's revealed that the american spy agency is somewhere snt region of the 5 billion pieces of information. here is how it works. you identified as an intelligence target. it's sending out signals as you are walking around. it can work out where you've been and who you've been speaking to. and if they also have a mobile phone. when you go online you may be able to
are not confidential. the washington post is reporting the national security agency tracks the location of nearly 5 billion cell phone calls daily. the post found out about the program in documents provided by former nsa analyst edward snowden. >> the los angeles county coroner's office said today that an autopsy on the body of actor paul walker found that he died of traumatic injuries and burns in that car crash saturday. his friend be roger rodas who was driving the porsche died of traumatic injuries. they are not sure what caused the crash, but speed was a factor. >> some crosswalks in downtown baltimore are being painted to look like hopscotch boards. another design is painted to look like a giant zipper. >>> some young ballerinas planning an annual holiday performance being upstaged by the president. >> a last minute scheduling conflict at american university forced a local ballet company out of the theater to make room for a network interview with president barack obama. >> an interview with the president of the united states doesn't happen every day. >> but a performance for the nutcracker d
by the national security agency is tracked around the world. according to the location, they have cell phones to look for behavior among terror suspects. >>> and 2 million facebook twitter and yahoo users have had their passwords stolen. they have been sending them to a server controlled by hackers. this mall wear keeps a record of everything they type into their users. >> they find everything you have ever sent. >> they say one of the biggest problems and mistakes people make is using the same passwords and that's why many are forcing people to come up with a more complex pass password. >>> the radioactive cobalt used in a hospital was on its way to a nuclear waste site when used thieves knew what was in the truck. now the truck has been recovered along with the radioactivity. many who have come in contact of the radioactivity can die with in days. >>> this is a possible kidnapping attempt. now they are hoping somebody will recognize the man and woman seen in the video and come forward with information. it happened at 6:00 tuesday night and the driver saw a man and woman fighting over a bag
be under surveillancy the n.s.a. they said the national security agency is tracking 5 billion cell phones every day. the paper cited documents from edward snowden. it means the spy agency could track the movement of almost any cell phone around the world. n.s.a. officials refused to comment, but said they don't collect data on sell phones in the united states. >>> tonight a new meningitis outbreak at the university of california, santa barbara o initials are racing to stop the bacteria spreading. brian rooney has more. >> four students at this cancer developed a rare form of meningitis in three weeks. one in four who catch it dee. 20% suffer permanent damage. >> when the outbreak started, when we had three cases two weeks ago, three cases in two weeks was a dangerous situation. >> a student, a freshman la cross player had such a serious case that both his feet had to be amputated. >> once it causes bloodpoichg, sepsis can be so overwelcoming, the body is tox. >>, and hand and feet are overwhelmed with infection andar amputated. >> students you warned to avoid close contact, sharing drinks
's the number of cell phone records the national security agency is reportedly collecting every day. that's five billion per day with a b. top secret do you means leaked by edward snowden reportedly show that they contract individuals and map their relationships. the agency said they collect data incidentally and not deliberately. next number, $5,000, actually it's $5,000 and a car is the amount rob ford reportedly offered a drug dealer in exchange for a potentially incriminating video that showed the mayor smoke smoking crack. the dealer refused to sell the video and wanted to hold on to the insurance policy. three is the number of times dennis rodman will have traveled to north korea. he announced he planned to go back on december 18th. he is training the north korean basketball team for a match. we say game in america. a game in january. rodman developed a close friendship with the dictator kim jung un. 28 inches is how much snow has been dropped in the last 24 hours in part parts of the midwest. two harbors. minnesota got slammed. that's a town there. schools are closed and roads are impassi
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
the u.s. national security agency is collecting billions of records of mobile phone locations from around the world every day. it is provided by edward snowden. we explain how a horrible phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network at the closest tower. when it does, your phone number is logged by the network, along with the tower you connected to, which means your location. if you're on the move, anyone with access to this information can track your route. the latest revelations suggest the n.s.a. is doing much more than just tracking individual suspects. by gathering and processing around 5 billion records each day, it is able to see which individuals are meeting or tracking together. >> you might be connected to a tower along with 100 other people. you move down the street and automatically you, fuel find connects to the next closest tower. let's say 20 of the 100 are moving the same direction you. move further down the road and say just five of the original 100
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
the documents that were leaked by edward snowden. the national security agency tracked the locations of up to 5 billion overseas cell phone calls, including those belonging to americans. the tracking picks up the names of the people the users are calling. it does not gather data on american cell phones inside the u.s. >>> president obama is wading into the minimum wage debate, as it grabs a spotlight today in cities coast-to-coast. president obama cled on congress to increase the federal minimum wage. he pressed for an extension to jobless benefits to over a million long-term unemployed people. they expire three days after christmas. >>> meantime, fast food workers across the country will have their say today. they're staging another round of walkouts for higher pay. among the demands, a $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to unionize. experts say such a pay increase could push up fast food costs by about 20%. put another way, the cost of a $3 hamburger could rise to around $3.50. >>> universal pictures is shutting down production on "fast & furious 7," to figure out how to proceed with the
of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. >>> the super secret national security agency actively monitoring hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. that, according to today's "the washington post" based on top secret documents divulged by edward snowden. they reveal the spy agency's gathering 5 billion cell phone records every 24 hours. brian todd is looking into the story. cell phones belonging to american as well, are they part of this? >> inadvertently, yes. the nsa, as you no, not allowed to spy on americans and senior u.s. intelligence official tells evan peres the location program, the one reported on, is focused on foreign targets. and the nsa says it does not intentionally target american but was the whereabouts the phones of some americans overseas and some in the u.s. could be collected inadvertently in these operations. a senior u.s. official tells perez they try to minimize that when an innocent american's cell phone's location is collected they try remove that from the database as soon as collected. they're trying to minimize and avoid targetin
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
edward snowden reveals a massive program by the national security agency to track the location of cell phones around the world. according to "washington post" they are gathering 5 billion records a day on the location of cell phones oversee seas -- overseas. the nsa's tracking program may be the reason that president obama is not allowed to have an iphone. there may be concern that phones could easily reveal his location. apple's smartphone is a favorite of nsa agents because iphone's operating system has 38 different features that can be tracked. >>> 8:16. more incriminating allegations against the mayor of toronto, rob ford. newly-released court documents indicate gang members may have had a video of mayor ford smoking crack cocaine. the documents describe wiretap recordings of gang members talking about black mailing the mayor. reportedly police did recover a copy of the video from a laptop computer. >>> the man accused of a deadly shooting in san francisco over a popular gaming system is due back in court on monday to enter a plea. 21-year-old ronnie collins made his first court ap
,000. >>> the latest bombshell from documents leaked by edward snowden. the national security agency reportedly tracks the locations of up to 5 billion cell phone overseas including those belonging to americans. the "washington post" reports the nsa is unintentionally gathering that information, including the name of the person called. the nsa has said it does not gather data on american cell phones inside the u.s. >>> european regulators have levied major fines against eight financial firms including two giant american banks. citigroup and jpmorgan chase are among the bank fined $2 billion for rigging interest rates. the commission said it was shocking to find so many banks that should have been competing against one another colluding instead. >>> the brutal snowstorm that shut down schools tapering off this morning but more unbearably cold air moving in. people in northern minnesota are racing to dig out from two feet of snow before the plunging temperatures turn everything in to ice. the slick roads are blamed for hundreds of accidents. >>> people in montana braving the coldest temperatures in year
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)